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Electrons Are Weird

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  • Published on Sep 17, 2022 veröffentlicht
  • Shop for science gear here: theactionlab.com/
    I show you how it looks to rotate an electron
    See the full video here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKKy2...
    Subscribe to my other channel here: clip-share.net/user/TheActionLab

Comments • 769

  • Tristan Campbell
    Tristan Campbell 2 months ago +7362

    Ok, that's it, no more Electrons for you

    • ellipsis Omega
      ellipsis Omega 20 days ago +1

      LOL.

    • Deで
      Deで Month ago +1

      Dang, no Electrons. I was so positive with that!

    • OGAMING
      OGAMING Month ago +1

      No I need them I only sniff about 17 grams a da- oh wait electrons oh sure get rid of em

    • Bahhiyih Lover
      Bahhiyih Lover Month ago

      @FoolishGold I didn’t know I’m so sorry!!

    • Sippin’ juice for life
      Sippin’ juice for life 2 months ago

      Nobody’s talking about how if you observe any electron at any point you’ll technically be seeing it on it’s down cork then it’s up cork all at the same time? I mean he was kind of close but I think he got confused with the - then + sign. You’d actually see them both negative and positive at any given time. This means you’re looking at one electron & two individual states in time. Is was RECENTLY proved by Cerns Hadron collider & was actually the focus of study before they shut down. What this means guys. Is they found the existence of another universe DIRECTLY IN OURS… there’s an “anti” universe if you will that is the EXACT opposite of our universe in the EXACT same place as ours. The only difference if everything’s running in reverse in their universe and whatever is happening here. It would be true to believe the opposite is happening there

  • FsbGaming
    FsbGaming 2 months ago +4784

    His quantum realm neighbors: Honey, the neighbor is again experimenting on the stray electrons.

  • lemonylizardlicker
    lemonylizardlicker 2 months ago +1345

    Watched it twice to complete the proper loop.

  • PlexterIP
    PlexterIP 2 months ago +1996

    wish my earphones could do that
    edit: comments have been pretty funny. Thanks for the laugh lol

    • PlexterIP
      PlexterIP 17 days ago +1

      @The Man I will edit as I please

    • The Man
      The Man 17 days ago

      This isn't Reddit, don't edit comments

    • Alextech
      Alextech Month ago

      ⚠️🅰️🅱️🈲㊙️👧🏼🆘🚱❓㊗️📴🈶📳🚷❕🚫🆔🉑📵❌🎩💢☢️👟📛♨️👕🈹👩‍👩‍👧‍👧👩🏻‍🎤

    • Katari_Uzuchina
      Katari_Uzuchina 2 months ago +1

      @Adam 熊さん that’s why you have to do it twice!

    • Gabriel Moore
      Gabriel Moore 2 months ago

      @dursty cuz its pretty 4iq

  • TalooshDaBoss
    TalooshDaBoss 2 months ago +563

    I saw the title and thought this video could help me with my physics e&m class, but I guess this is a little more in depth lol

    • Jivan Pal
      Jivan Pal 2 months ago +5

      The concept described here is that the periodicity of a "spinor" is 4π radians rather than 2π radians, which on the surface is a weird fact. Rest assured that you won't encounter spinors unless you study particle physics at university. They are an abstract mathematical object that is relevant when describing the Standard Model of particle physics using group theory (a branch of abstract mathematics).
      As far as high school level teaching is concerned, you will encounter the notion of "spin" (formally "spin angular momentum") in higher-level physics and chemistry. The presence of spin and the Pauli exclusion principle are responsible for the Aufbau principle, which determines the order in which electrons fill the electron shells of atoms/elements.
      None of this is directly relevant to electromagnetism, and it certainly doesn't relate in any way to rotating an electron.

    • TalooshDaBoss
      TalooshDaBoss 2 months ago

      @Teddy Smith yeah seemed like quantum mechanics, I really wanna learn that stuff too

    • Commentify
      Commentify 2 months ago +5

      Lmao he revealed all magicans secrets.

    • Teddy Smith
      Teddy Smith 2 months ago +21

      E&M is just the basics. It's a macro approach to a quantum problem. Quantum mechanics classes are where you might begin to go into this sort of material

    • ghex hsdhujvcfbsdhucvrej
      ghex hsdhujvcfbsdhucvrej 2 months ago +9

      its what you learn in chem lol

  • Austin
    Austin 2 months ago +591

    “Except it’s not a ball and it’s not spinning”

    • The Blue Phoenix: Captain Gamer
      The Blue Phoenix: Captain Gamer Month ago

      @Tacodude17 yes

    • Tacodude17
      Tacodude17 Month ago

      ​@The Blue Phoenix: Captain Gamer orbital

    • Nick Haluta
      Nick Haluta 2 months ago

      As he said a good representation of a “wave function”

    • Arsenii Yefremov
      Arsenii Yefremov 2 months ago +2

      @Korra Akhiluday yes, exactly!
      However technically you can traverse an infinite amount of steps in a finite time, although specific rules must be abided. For example, you can cover half of a certain distance in 0.5 sec, then half of the remaining distance in 0.25 s, then in 0.125 s and in 0.0625 s and so on ad infinitum...
      After 1 second you will cover the full distance, even though there was an infinite amout of steps (and will reach a full stop at that point given more time that 1 sec)
      I guess with this knowledge you could somehow touch Gojo in the end, haha

    • Korra Akhiluday
      Korra Akhiluday 2 months ago

      @Arsenii Yefremov wow that was quite a good analogy.
      And Zeno Paradox = Gojo Satoru?? Lol 😆 🤣

  • Kono Veldora Da!
    Kono Veldora Da! 2 months ago +1313

    *The kid behind the screen trying to figure out the magic used by the Wizard which changed the sign on the ball after a revolution around the ball.*

    • Himanshu Bhushan Dubey
      Himanshu Bhushan Dubey 2 months ago +5

      Quantum Bamboozlement.

    • The1AndOnlyMango
      The1AndOnlyMango 2 months ago +1

      thousandth like

    • DarkDay2012
      DarkDay2012 2 months ago +2

      A message to that kid: It's just physics, buddy

    • Amora G
      Amora G 2 months ago +3

      Ya'll just hatin' because he's the reincarnation of Houdini..

    • asdfghyter
      asdfghyter 2 months ago +15

      Putting the camera down to get a still shot made it a bit too obvious where the cut is. You don’t even need video editing. Just pausing the camera while switching the label on the ball.

  • Commentify
    Commentify 2 months ago +37

    How complicated do you want this?
    Him: yes👍

    • Commentify
      Commentify 2 months ago +2

      @Normal person well no, I'm studying this stuff in university and going to study more on mechanics 👍

    • Normal person
      Normal person 2 months ago

      Welcome to quantum mechanics

  • WhiteDevil
    WhiteDevil 2 months ago +250

    Feels more like a hypnotising video

  • shorea27
    shorea27 2 months ago +23

    I don't get it, but the moving ribbons look sooo mesmerizing. 😵‍💫

  • Exxon47
    Exxon47 2 months ago +3

    This is like the video that I keep finding where somehow it's possible to turn a ball inside out with some weird rules of this material that can go through each itself but can't crease it looks exactly like that

    • Smug Mug
      Smug Mug Month ago

      The video you are referring to concerns topology. This video (although implicitly) concerns group theory (one of the main mathematical disciplines used for the Standard Model of Physics)

  • w4shep
    w4shep 2 months ago

    I really love the 3D animations. They help us to visualize the incomprehensible.
    I thought electrons exist as a probabilistic cloud, rather than a satellite orbiting a central point?

  • ninthRing
    ninthRing 2 months ago

    This metaphor for electron "spin" explains so much. It's like an eccentrically rotating sphere travelling through a figure 8 of axial progression until it returns to it's origin point.

  • gordon stull
    gordon stull 2 months ago

    Excellent! That explains the attachments, of the under-square vortices to the surface of our earth. That surface tension balancing mechanism is held in place by the force that pulls-straight inwardly, in an inertial frame of reference.

  • Matt P.
    Matt P. 2 months ago

    Thank you for this visualization, this is such a great way to explain particle spin

  • OctagonalSquare
    OctagonalSquare 2 months ago

    If you’ve ever tried to solve a gear cube, you know the pain of having stuff in the right spot but you have to spin it a lot to get them rotated properly

  • Kareza Alonso
    Kareza Alonso 2 months ago +1

    This man always has a new spin on physics

  • SPARTAN Cayde-26
    SPARTAN Cayde-26 2 months ago +40

    Funny how this looks like some 90s 3D modelling stuff and I like it because the nostalgia!

  • vahidmirkhani
    vahidmirkhani 2 months ago

    Just in case this helps:
    The + and - where not the "charge" of the electron (that never changes), but the magnetic dipole moment of it (which has two poles, + & -). So if you look at the + side of this dipole, you cannot come back to it by going around once (which is counterintuitive for macroscopic creatures like us). You have to go around twice to get to the same pole and hence, the "one-half" spin of an electron.

  • Madison schrody
    Madison schrody Day ago

    Wait what . I genuinely understood nothing from this video

  • KingCarrotRL
    KingCarrotRL 2 months ago +161

    Whoa! I have no idea what this means or how it relates to anything else!

    • witch hazel
      witch hazel 2 months ago

      @Jivan Pal Whoa, that opened a whole new rabbit hole to go down. 😃

    • witch hazel
      witch hazel 2 months ago

      @Jivan Pal Thanks for giving a useful reply! I'll check it out.

    • Jivan Pal
      Jivan Pal 2 months ago

      @Matityahu Your loss 🤷‍♂

    • Matityahu
      Matityahu 2 months ago

      @Jivan Pal yeah, no thanks

    • Jivan Pal
      Jivan Pal 2 months ago

      @Matityahu They did not need to understand quantum mechanics, but they also certainly did not just put wires together. Take a look into the work of Michael Faraday and his contemporaries.

  • Vecheslav Novikov
    Vecheslav Novikov 2 months ago

    That makes a scary amount of sense and even helps conceptualise string theory.

  • Sam Hall
    Sam Hall 2 months ago +33

    PBS Spacetime did an episode on this! I think this is their animation. Nice deep dive on the topic.

  • Johan Haukeness
    Johan Haukeness 2 months ago

    This makes me wonder if it would be possible to create an object in 3D that wasn't the same upon 360 degree rotation, and instead took 720. 🤔

  • Crowbarralf
    Crowbarralf Month ago

    He's right there's literally no editing on the ball, it happens to me sometimes when walked around on the object 2 times and sometimes it looks different

  • Jinxyle
    Jinxyle 2 months ago

    that actually really helped my understanding of electrons

  • Vincentius
    Vincentius 2 months ago +512

    I'm more confused now than when I started send help

    • Sea Geo
      Sea Geo Month ago

      @Paul Flocken Therefore, proton’s have a negative state too?

    • Paul Flocken
      Paul Flocken Month ago +3

      @Sea Geo Since spin has direction, instead of a plus and minus made of blue tape he should have made an arrow first pointing up and then a second arrow pointing down. Then you would not have the confusion of a negatively charged electron having a 'positive' state. It really was a sloppy way of describing what you are observing.

    • letsomethingshine
      letsomethingshine 2 months ago +3

      @Marilyn B Moral of the story is that the video version of twitter cannot teach you anything either, only entertain you for it's length.

    • Julian Brelsford
      Julian Brelsford 2 months ago +1

      @Sea Geo yeah I found that strange too.

    • Sea Geo
      Sea Geo 2 months ago +2

      Electron in a “plus” state? (My brain got stuck). I missed that lesson. Where is the link?

  • Alej Random
    Alej Random 2 months ago +2

    -what is spin?
    -Imagine a ball spinning, except it's not a ball and it ain't spinning
    ---Feynman, probably

  • Hotaru
    Hotaru 2 months ago

    I love that they went all out with the computer simulation/CGI, but then went halfway on simple camerawork.

  • Toonasa G•
    Toonasa G• 2 months ago

    This was mind boggling, even as a science student

  • Cynnicysm
    Cynnicysm 2 months ago

    Action lab and I have something in common: our 6’ folding plastic table puts in work in the shop 😂

  • Dr. Offe T. Raydar
    Dr. Offe T. Raydar 2 months ago +159

    This is a real "Arigato, Gyro" moment

  • 9a3eedi
    9a3eedi 2 months ago

    This feels like a mechanic that would work in the outer wilds

  • Paul Peters
    Paul Peters 2 months ago

    Brilliant analogy. Thanks. The geometry of fermions is why we have space-time or something.

  • Logan Spargo
    Logan Spargo 2 months ago +2

    That transition was almost perfect

  • Angelo Alexander
    Angelo Alexander 2 months ago +1

    Reality at this scale, as far as we can interpret is fascinating

  • Mr. L3G3NDARY
    Mr. L3G3NDARY 2 months ago +1

    Can you spin a sphere within a sphere and keep them from not touching using electromagnetism but spin the inner-sphere in this configuration. What would happen?

    • Mr. L3G3NDARY
      Mr. L3G3NDARY 2 months ago +1

      Instead of belts use quantum entangled particles

  • jason unrine
    jason unrine 2 months ago

    This is the best explanation of electron spin I’ve seen.

  • Stanley Chang
    Stanley Chang 2 months ago +1

    The gif in the beginning is real. It looks too impossible so I made one out of a wood block and elastic bands fixed in the xyz axis, and by carefully manipulating the elastic bands, I could rotate the wood block indefinitely without tangling or twisting the elastic bands.

  • Jack Beach
    Jack Beach 2 months ago

    Do this with magnets to make a glass cube table with a floating cube with belts attached that never get tangled

  • Mr. Matthews
    Mr. Matthews 2 months ago

    Does this apply to magnetics as well?

  • ultramail11
    ultramail11 2 months ago

    That's kind of similar to rolling one quarter around another the outside quarter takes two revolutions to go all the way around another quarter but they have the same circumference how does that work?

  • J. H.
    J. H. 2 months ago

    You will be a great teacher to get them interested in science.

  • DirtyLesion
    DirtyLesion 2 months ago +4

    I was thinking about this kind of thing earlier today funnily enough, I'd like a design of dog leash that I could attach multiple dogs to the same anchor point

  • Jesse Gelatnis
    Jesse Gelatnis 2 months ago +8

    You have an amazing talent... You explain the most simple concepts in such an obscure and confusing way.

  • XOFOX's Archives
    XOFOX's Archives 2 months ago

    Does that means there's a possibility we can create an infinite loop to generate energy source by any means or theories?

  • Sathish Kannan
    Sathish Kannan 2 months ago +1

    Wow, that makes a lots of sense with string theory.

  • Sanguine
    Sanguine 2 months ago

    Could you use this for vehicle movement?

  • Jale Howard
    Jale Howard 2 months ago

    I was trying to imagine a physical machine with pistons and gears spinning the cube, then I saw the sphere 🤯 my head started spinning..... headache

  • Mc Gaming
    Mc Gaming 2 months ago +6

    Those first 2 clips were confusing and trippy af but I got the point after he did the + and - thingy on the ball

  • Xenomnipotent
    Xenomnipotent 2 months ago +1

    You can just tell me that electrons work because of magic and I’d believe you

  • M H
    M H 2 months ago +2

    Anyone one else have to watch this like 5-6 times in a row to figure just what the heck he was explaining..

  • Timothy Maddux
    Timothy Maddux 2 months ago

    This is an amazing way to visualize it. Thanks

  • C-130
    C-130 2 months ago

    A four stroke engine requires two full rotations to complete its cycle and return to where it started. Coincidence?
    No!
    It’s controlled chaos.
    Now back to our regularly scheduled mayhem.

  • Christine Ervin
    Christine Ervin 2 months ago

    Now imagine energy coming from the sun to the earth these filaments for the most part unwind and we get our weather sometimes they make their way down and stick directly to the surface you will see them is craters and volcanoes. I see them as an area on the Earth that is behaving like the sun because it is being burned by the sun like Io is to Jupiter as Enceladus is to Saturn. Realize without one atm of pressure and ine G of gravity lava fountains would be flung into space, just like a comet.

  • Leandro Laus
    Leandro Laus 2 months ago

    You should have started by writing a linear equation combining two eigenstates to explain this… I’m sure it would have made more sense!

  • KosmicKalamity
    KosmicKalamity Month ago +1

    Very cool demonstration. I’ll just pretend I understand it and move on with my life

  • Darrian Weathington
    Darrian Weathington 2 months ago +3

    And yet, my charging cables still get tangled

  • Skookapalooza
    Skookapalooza 2 months ago

    This guy is crazy brilliant. 💡

  • alexU42k
    alexU42k 2 months ago

    Waw, amazing editing skills. That's weird 😃

  • Tadashi Minami
    Tadashi Minami 2 months ago +13

    Looks like an episode of Magic's Biggest Secrets Finally Revealed

    • EGRJ
      EGRJ 2 months ago +1

      Except with a less pervy announcer.

  • Russell Perry
    Russell Perry 2 months ago

    I was thinking more how it resembled magnetic sheets from earth to the sun to the larger galactic wave currently cruising through us.

  • Gyan Prabhakar
    Gyan Prabhakar 2 months ago +61

    Smooth transition ✨

  • J. A.
    J. A. 2 months ago +1

    So if you pull the tape off of a Styrofoam ball that's an electron ?
    😂

  • tennesean man
    tennesean man Month ago

    Props to the animator for animating the belts

  • Joe Boudreault
    Joe Boudreault Month ago

    Don't quite understand the physics here, but that's some damn good video editing...

  • Nima Master
    Nima Master 2 months ago

    "You'll notice it takes two full turns to go back to original position"
    Will I? I don't think I will Mr.

  • Killyour Ego
    Killyour Ego Month ago

    That string spin animation is trippy.

  • Mustafa Abdul Sahib

    wow is that a real electron! thats so cool how did he get it this big

  • Phani Gautam
    Phani Gautam 2 months ago

    But what does 2 full revolutions even mean at that scale? Does it have the same meaning as regular revolutions?

  • Cat of the Castle
    Cat of the Castle 2 months ago

    I want that for moving wall art! It’s mesmerizing!

  • Cozmo
    Cozmo 2 months ago

    The beginning fits so well with the end I didn’t realize that it looped

  • Hemi Nuiraho
    Hemi Nuiraho 2 months ago

    if you build a model of the electron out of some strong and durable material say...steel or fibreglass you can use it to drive say...a driveshaft.

  • cut my life into pizzas

    This absolutely fudged my mind on all quantum levels.

  • TheMadWarden
    TheMadWarden 2 months ago +1

    Isn't the definition of an electron "lepton with a charge of 1-?" How can it be positive?

    • Cosmalano
      Cosmalano 2 months ago

      This is about spin, not charge. He used + to refer to spin up and - to refer to spin down. Poor explanation

  • Thomas Hank Hogan
    Thomas Hank Hogan 2 months ago +1

    Can you do this with magnets ?

  • klazzera
    klazzera 2 months ago

    how does that cube spin without getting tangled?

  • Rumpelstiltskin
    Rumpelstiltskin 2 months ago

    What a lovely explanation.

  • Lisa C
    Lisa C 2 months ago

    Took a class that actually explained this phenomenon in college and I’ma be honest, still don’t know what this means

  • Marc mardoquio
    Marc mardoquio Month ago

    I wish cable wires were made like this

  • Codyiguess
    Codyiguess 2 months ago +2

    Sega explaining how Tails is able to spin his tails to fly and not get tangled up.

  • Galactic Lava
    Galactic Lava 2 months ago +7

    That cut was clean.

  • Jay K
    Jay K 2 months ago +5

    *Electrons:* "No, *you're* weird.."

  • Ryan Evans
    Ryan Evans 2 months ago

    Best explanation I’ve seen on this.

  • Dean DeanN
    Dean DeanN 2 months ago +1

    The animation fools your eyes. You can't do that without twisting the strings into knots.

  • Scarlet Witch
    Scarlet Witch 2 months ago

    I really wish I had a good understanding of physics and maths but my brain just isn't capable.

  • Bungholio
    Bungholio 2 months ago

    Wouldn't the belts eventually twist and break?

  • BASED:
    BASED: 2 months ago

    wow you just made my brain understand electrons less

  • BrightWeb Ltd
    BrightWeb Ltd Month ago

    Tesseracts make more sense now! Thank you

  • Waterpassion
    Waterpassion 2 months ago +1

    Your 3D models reminds me of the old Windows PC screensavers from the late nineties early 2000s. Like XP version or before. Lol

  • KrXza
    KrXza 2 months ago +25

    that’s some crazy editing

    • Joe Boudreault
      Joe Boudreault Month ago +1

      The jerky parts was where the video was edited...

  • chase1146
    chase1146 2 months ago

    Now replace those belts with headphone wires and keep it stationary and it’s impossible for them not to get tangled

  • Kaela Herrington
    Kaela Herrington 2 months ago +1

    Smooth cut on that first transition 😲

  • Hild das Schild
    Hild das Schild Month ago

    This is so fascinating!

  • Michael Emerson
    Michael Emerson 2 months ago +2

    This turn down and turn up is extraordinary 👌

  • ItsLadyJadey
    ItsLadyJadey 2 months ago

    I think this is the first time I don't understand what you're trying to teach me... Shorts must not be long enough for my smooth brain to grasp a concept.

  • Cosmalano
    Cosmalano 2 months ago

    I hope you read all these comments and do another video, you confused a lot of people! I recommend things like the Dirac belt trick or the “toy” described on the orientation entanglement Wikipedia page to illustrate the neat properties of spinors, vs a camera trick. You lost a lot of people with that

  • amb
    amb 2 months ago +1

    Electron : This action lab guy is spinning weirdly

  • R Cube
    R Cube 2 months ago

    I think its wrong. So for spin half particle the state of the particle reaches to the same state within just half spin. What you are describing is spin 2 particle.

  • bobbobbo
    bobbobbo 2 months ago

    I still think I'm going to fail chemistry