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Killer Bass Exercise to Build Your Technique, Fluidity and Harmony Chops // Scott's Bass Lessons

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  • Published on Jul 7, 2016 veröffentlicht
  • In this lesson I'm going to show you one of my all time favourite technique exercises, deconstruct it piece by piece and also show you how you can apply it within your solo lines.
    The great thing about this exercise is that not only does it really push your string crossing techniques to the limit - but by mastering it you will also learn all of the arpeggios that are within the major scale, all in one fingering position!
    This exercise is great for your technique, your string crossing, and your harmony chops too. Three birds with one stone!
    Ooo... and make sure you watch it to the end, as I also show you how you can take this exercise and start applying it to your solo lines too - it's super fun.
    As always, see you in the shed...
    Scott :)
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Comments • 555

  • Qu14torze
    Qu14torze Year ago +31

    JUST IN CASE IT CAN HELP SOMEONE:
    From each of the notes within any major scale there is a chord built from it.
    An arpeggio is just a chord played one note at a time.
    4:28 C major arpeggio
    4:37 D minor arpeggio
    4:41 E minor arpeggio
    4:46 F major arpeggio
    4:50 G dominant 7 arpeggio
    4:54 A minor arpeggio
    4:58 B minor 7 b5 arpeggio
    7:49 ascending arpeggios
    8:05 descending arpeggios
    Say the arpeggios as you play them:
    C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G dominant 7, A minor, B minor 7 b5.
    13:07 Then say the notes with them:
    C, E, G, B
    D, F, A C
    E, G, B, D
    F, A, C, E
    G, B, D, F
    A, B, E, G
    B, D, F, A
    All of these arpeggios work on the C major chord/tonality.

    • Nemanja Milosevic
      Nemanja Milosevic 11 days ago +1

      @Erwan Legrand thanks, you are right

    • Erwan Legrand
      Erwan Legrand 2 months ago

      @Gene Ciccone They can't! That's a typo obviously. Am7 is A, C, E, G and not A, B, E, G.

    • Gene Ciccone
      Gene Ciccone 2 months ago +1

      How can the G and A have the same 3rd????

    • Oven toster
      Oven toster 5 months ago

      Best comment bro thanks a lot

    • Andrès Richly
      Andrès Richly 7 months ago

      Genious

  • codex105
    codex105 5 years ago +227

    C major scale:
    1. C major - Ionian mode
    2. D minor -Dorian mode
    3. E minor - Phrygian mode
    4. F major - Lydian mode
    5. G dominant - Mixolydian mode
    6. A minor - Aeolian mode
    7 B minor - Locrian mode
    Just start on the next note, and then the next one, and so on... and go trough all the notes of the arpegio, it will show you the light.

    • Martin Jones
      Martin Jones 3 months ago

      One helpful visualization tool is the piano keyboard, where the modes related to the C major scale means you play only the white keys.
      If you play a C major scale, you start at C and play all of the white keys- that sequence of intervals, separated by the black keys is: (C) D (E) F (G) A (B) and called the "Ionian mode". The 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 Cmajor/Cmajor7 chord tones are in brackets...
      If we stay in the key of C major/ (all white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of D, we will create a scale of (D) E (F) G (A) B (C) called "Dorian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are a D minor/Dmin7. ...
      If we stay in the key of C major/ (all white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of E, we will create a scale of (E) F (G) A (B) C (D) called "Phrygian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are an E minor/Emin7.....
      If we stay in the key of C major/(white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of F, we will create a scale of (F) G (A) B (C) D (E) called "Lydian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are an F major/Fmaj7.
      If we stay in the key of C major/(white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of G we will create a scale of (G) A (B) C (D) E (F) called "Mixolydian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are an Gmaj/G(dom)7.
      If we stay in the key of C major/(white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of A, we will create a scale of (A) B (C) D (E) F (G) called "Aeolian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are an A minor/Amin7 (*This scale/mode starting on the sixth note of a major scale is called the relative minor*)
      If we stay in the key of C major/(white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of B, we will create a scale of (B) C (D) E (F) G (A) called "Locrian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are a B(minor) diminished/Bmin7b5.
      This is one of the few parts of music theory I have studied and grasped, and it is a huge help when the light goes off. I hope this description might help?
      I will edit if anyone points out errors/corrections, thanks!

    • Feng Shui Silverback
      Feng Shui Silverback Year ago

      @Allegorical Statue
      @Allegorical Statue
      I think I'm understanding a little bit of this bullsxxt now!
      So, basically
      (1) the notes in C major are
      C D E F G A B
      (2) The Notes in G Major are
      G A B C D E F#
      (3) notes in D Major are
      D E F# G A B C#
      You basically are trying to get the notes in (2) and (3) and match-up with (1)
      So in (2) you would b7(Making this a DOMINANT SCALE) and in (3) you would b3 and b7(making this a whatever-ian, but it has a name!)
      Please tell me a light bulb in my head partially went off!🙏🏿😂

    • airanwater01
      airanwater01 Year ago

      @Soul Trap thanks dude! Great idea 🙏

    • Iopne
      Iopne Year ago

      @Allegorical Statue im confused ahhh man i swear for me its interesting and i want to learn more

    • Soul Trap
      Soul Trap Year ago +1

      @airanwater01 Hey, try playing a Dm chord over a sustained C and listen to how it sounds. In fact try it with all chords over C so you can hear its relationsip to each chord of the scale. Its hard to understand scales if you don't have a harmonic backdrop to hear the tonal function of each chord within any scale.

  • Greg Plays Guitar
    Greg Plays Guitar Year ago +9

    To anyone looking for a tab to this exercise, I created one here: i.imgur.com/RpBhgUJ.png
    Includes the notes, chord names and arpeggios. Enjoy!

    • Cholatemilk1
      Cholatemilk1 2 months ago

      my guy

    • Etienne Zarza
      Etienne Zarza 3 months ago

      thank u g

    • weezahriah
      weezahriah 10 months ago

      Oh my goodness!!!!! Thank you SOOOOOO much! I was kicking myself for being so slow I couldnt tell what he was doing even when he did it slow and super slow, is this a scale or something else I was searching and saying it has to be easier than this. You made my day!

  • James Mondry
    James Mondry 6 years ago +9

    This is brilliant. I love that you've used the 7th chords for the arpeggios. That really opens up a lot melodically for the musicians who practice this.

  • Cameron Stull
    Cameron Stull 6 years ago +264

    man, how do you come up with these lessons? i mean, i know you must have had great teachers, but you are really breaking down music theory on bass here. for free. i also know you have more in depth lessons on your website and in your academy. i guess im not asking a question. i just wanted to say ive been watching your videos on youtube for a while and still ive learned so much from so little. you really know how to jam pack knowledge brother. your such a great teacher. oh i do have a question! when in your career and why did you decide to take teaching so seriously? maybe you were showing a band mate something and just blew his mind all casually and realized you had a knack for it? sincerely thanks. :)

    • Riverland REZ
      Riverland REZ 2 years ago +1

      @Johnny Mac FuK …between the Bass Strat Keyboard and soon as my strings get here Acoustic …I’M in Zepher mode..might even hunt down my HighSkool Trumpet… it’s in Da house somewhere…happy with the Strat …they did good job except for loading strings and fret ends…was pre warned …but it rocks..no neck drop. stays it place.. using spark 40 amp…. cables on the way and strings too… Covid not keeping me down…BUT do respect it…Via a Mask when in Public Indoors

    • Johnny Mac
      Johnny Mac 2 years ago

      @Riverland REZ Good luck with the Strat. I’m a guitar player too

    • Riverland REZ
      Riverland REZ 2 years ago +1

      ​@Ernandez Edme I got somne good tips from Scott…my BAss even Beast Mode Mainly. …getting very comfortable around the frets…Getting a Fender Strat. see how that goes…Bass on the Spark 40 amp and tone bank…endless NOISE…to some that is

    • Riverland REZ
      Riverland REZ 2 years ago +1

      @Ernandez Edme some people don’t charge for their passion..and he’s making good google money anyways….all Good.. ESHIT COVID

    • Ernandez Edme
      Ernandez Edme 2 years ago +3

      Dude shut up 😂 u gonna make him change his mind. Music school is expensive. Just learned the thing in peace 🤣stop saying the (free) word.

  • Kai Mizuno
    Kai Mizuno 3 years ago +4

    There is a big difference between now I can play jazz harmonically and past I didn't know knowledge of chord harmony well.
    2 years ago, I could't understand this video's topic, but now I can absorb many information from this.
    Thanks for my great teacher scott devine, now I am on higher level than my past self.

  • Christian Mildh
    Christian Mildh 2 years ago +39

    Great lessons. It would be very helpful for newbies if you had small chord charts on screen as you are doing chord sequences, since the exact fingering is often hard to see. It would of course require more work at your end.

    • D R
      D R 11 months ago +1

      Alfred Smith Definitely too fast for me but he definitely pointed me in a direction I need to go, just going to take me a little more time…a few more pauses and repeats…..
      ….20 minutes on after listening at half speed this lesson has taken me on a huge leap.

    • Alfred Smith
      Alfred Smith Year ago +2

      He blows through these and talks over what he's playing which makes it worse.

    • OliseForel
      OliseForel Year ago

      @Greg Plays Guitar Thank you that is great!

  • Joel Giroux
    Joel Giroux 3 years ago

    Scott, this is such a fabulous lesson -- among so many that you share for free here on Clip-Share -- I return to it regularly. I love how you keep coming back to the Cmaj scale -- and all its modes, chords, and arpeggios -- as a point of focus for learning the entire fretboard, and for grasping the main tenets of music theory. Your generosity and brilliance as a player and teacher are unmatched anywhere online. Thank you.

  • MrGRUVES
    MrGRUVES 2 years ago +1

    Here in 2020:
    I've been practicing this like crazy. Building speed, fret-board knowledge, and harmonic knowledge!
    Starting messing around with soloing on a simple chord progression. This specific exercise has really come in handy making me capable of simple soloing and being able to actually sound musical!
    This is an awesome lesson/exercise!

  • Mathieu C
    Mathieu C 4 years ago +1

    Most of your videos are great Scott, but this one is just AMAZING! Fantastic exercise that will take weeks to master. Thank you.

  • Rodolfo Ferreira
    Rodolfo Ferreira 5 years ago

    Just got a acoustic bass for Christmas and joined the SBL, and this class here was a mind blow, that opened my vision for the major scale a lot!! Great!

  • Free America
    Free America 3 years ago

    This is sooooo useful. If you can map one whole major scale across the neck ... this exercise(s) gives you total control of the neck no matter how fast the changes. Thank you scott. I am a member.

  • Phantom Lord
    Phantom Lord 3 years ago +6

    Hi Scott, I am a guitar player and I find your courses be valid on guitar too. And even better than other professional youtubers specialized on guitar. thumbs up!!!!!

  • BayAreaBlues
    BayAreaBlues 6 years ago

    Fantastic lesson, Scott. A great way to focus on learning the notes for the chords in a scale. This will help me tremendously with my guitar work as well. Thanks!!

  • Kevin Lynch
    Kevin Lynch 5 years ago +1

    Epic lesson Scott! I love it and thank you for all you do for us four stringers (and five....and six 😜)!

  • Jonoroxat
    Jonoroxat 6 years ago

    I love your lessons Scott they've been such a great help to get me started on the bass! keep it up man!

  • Rudy Bigboote
    Rudy Bigboote Year ago +1

    Great Lesson Scott! I can speak from personal experience that this is absolutely crucial for bassists to know. As a self taught bassist I struggled for years but I just didn't get any better; this was before Clip-Share. When I learned exactly what Scott demonstrated in this lesson it finally clicked for me! All of a sudden I could finally improvise freely and musically on the bass. Learn it!

    • kangham
      kangham Year ago

      It’s nice to have rules and follow them rather than stumbling upon something complementary. Bands depend on bass players to add the modal harmony since it determines the context of a progression. I’m in the same boat transitioning from soloist to bass (and not get bored).

  • Rob Ashley
    Rob Ashley 5 years ago

    Probably one of the best lessons of all time.... this explains a lot. Thanks Scott

  • Sound Laboratories / Sounds Right Sound

    Amazing!! I wish there were a tab component to follow along with. Thank you Scott!!

  • Pedro Mattos - Bass Player

    Wonderful exercise, Scott! Very useful!!!
    I'm practicing it. Thanks for your online Lessons!

  • jmattbassplaya90
    jmattbassplaya90 6 years ago

    Scott - Excellent lesson as always. The part that peaked my interest the most was when you began to implement chromatic notes into your playing. I would love to see a lesson that dives deeper into that with regard to constructing bass lines over traditional jazz progressions.

  • Carl Gavet
    Carl Gavet 6 years ago

    Thanks Scott. An awesome lesson worth the price of admission to your courses. I'm in....
    Really appreciate the time and detail you went into explaining what you were doing. The linking of arpeggios was a revelation. Thanks again.

  • Martin Jones
    Martin Jones 3 months ago +3

    One helpful visualization tool is the piano keyboard, where the modes related to the C major scale means you play only the white keys.
    If you play a C major scale, you start at C and play all of the white keys- that sequence of intervals, separated by the black keys is: (C) D (E) F (G) A (B) and called the "Ionian mode". The 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 Cmajor/Cmajor7 chord tones are in brackets...
    If we stay in the key of C major/ (all white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of D, we will create a scale of (D) E (F) G (A) B (C) called "Dorian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are a D minor/Dmin7. ...
    If we stay in the key of C major/ (all white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of E, we will create a scale of (E) F (G) A (B) C (D) called "Phrygian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are an E minor/Emin7.....
    If we stay in the key of C major/(white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of F, we will create a scale of (F) G (A) B (C) D (E) called "Lydian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are an F major/Fmaj7.
    If we stay in the key of C major/(white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of G we will create a scale of (G) A (B) C (D) E (F) called "Mixolydian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are an Gmaj/G(dom)7.
    If we stay in the key of C major/(white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of A, we will create a scale of (A) B (C) D (E) F (G) called "Aeolian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are an A minor/Amin7 (*This scale/mode starting on the sixth note of a major scale is called the relative minor*)
    If we stay in the key of C major/(white keys), but we play a scale starting on the note of B, we will create a scale of (B) C (D) E (F) G (A) called "Locrian mode", and the 1-3-5 triad and 1-3-5-7 chord tones are a B(minor) diminished/Bmin7b5.
    This is one of the few parts of music theory I have studied and grasped, and it is a huge help when the light goes off. I hope this description might help?
    I will edit if anyone points out errors/corrections, thanks!

  • Frederick Thorne
    Frederick Thorne 3 years ago

    I owe so much to Scott for these lessons. I can't imagine playing bass without his instruction.

  • Jam Xandre
    Jam Xandre 3 years ago

    this is an awesome excercise! I really appreciate what you do man. Seriously. I've already noticed a vast improvement in my technique from watching your videos.

  • Eric Kinser
    Eric Kinser 3 years ago

    This arpeggio exercise has helped me more than anything else I've worked on. Been using it for a few years now. My playing has improved so much I can't thank you enough.It's such a great finger pattern memorization study. I've tried many different exercises and books on learning but this one really sticks with me. Thanks!

  • cat, sans tail
    cat, sans tail 6 months ago

    I appreciate being able to conceptualize the lesson before trying to memorize the arpeggios
    4:25

  • Jam Grantham
    Jam Grantham 5 years ago

    Such a great video! Very helpful! But mostly very inspiring, truly. I’m actually looking at picking up the Nate Mendel P Bass after Christmas. Thanks Scott!

  • MrDSAPPY
    MrDSAPPY 5 years ago

    this is probably one of the most important exercises for any bass player ever! I'd suggest doing arpeggio's of all the chord inversions, 7th, half diminished, and fully diminished as well.

  • Matteo Occhineri
    Matteo Occhineri 6 years ago +1

    simple and really clear in the explications :) love your lessons!

  • phatbassanchor
    phatbassanchor 4 years ago +1

    Don't be too hard on yourself about plecking. A pick is also known as a plectrum. So, say pleck all you like! This is hands down the best lesson I've had in over 40 years of playing bass! This is a genuine 'light bulb' over the head, Eureka! moment for me. Thank you Scott! Keep on plecking!

  • ron frey
    ron frey 4 years ago +11

    Scott from this lesson I just came up with an ascending and descending arpeggiated take of these chords or a slight modification of some notes and it comes out sounding very classical and its quite astounding considering Im not a bass player but from this one lesson It just opened my head right up and seeing the chord shapes white gloves on dark fingerboard is helpful for me to see exactly what is then just burn it into memory..
    Harmonizing the major scale and arpeggiating all the way up and down is what im doing
    I had to slow the speed down to see how your doing it all in one position MOST AWESOME LESSON Completely opens my head to thinking like a bassists vs a guitarist playing bass..
    I also take what you just showed me back to guitar hope you dont mind me running with that..
    Fantastic man !

  • Tom Anonym
    Tom Anonym 3 years ago

    When you showed the arpeggio progressions and chords you can do from a cmajor and its modes my mind was opened a lot. It was just what I was looking for. A simple yet wildly effective way of expanding my musical vocabulary. Thank you so much Scott!

  • Caio Cezar Silva Pereira
    Caio Cezar Silva Pereira 9 months ago +1

    I'm Brazilian and my english is not perfect, but I learned a lot with you. I hope I learn more with you. Thanks, Scott! God bless youu

  • Steven Thompson
    Steven Thompson 5 years ago +2

    Another mind-blower, Scott, thanks! Killer exercise, man ...

  • Jake Ficken
    Jake Ficken 10 months ago

    Scott I’ve spent a week on this lesson already. I keep taking it in bit by bit but this one was a gem.

  • Toastrodamus
    Toastrodamus 3 years ago

    My god, this is an incredible lesson. I can't wait to try this out. Your advice about getting your right hand patterns consistent is so good.

  • Milos Maricevic
    Milos Maricevic 5 months ago

    Putting the things where they ought to be. Love it.

  • Bela Kiss
    Bela Kiss Year ago

    Scott my favorite bass player is Ryan Martini. His style very unique, even the way he tunes the bass....It would be nice if you took the time to cover Ryan's playing and style...Thanks Scott a big fan...

  • Benom8
    Benom8 6 years ago +1

    Looks like a great exercise! It'll be a good way to practice the modes I've learned.

  • Ross Campoli - Business Videos

    Scott’s built such an amazing educational library here, for free. I’m a member at the website, but you can’t beat all these youtube lessons as great reminders and tips

  • RearViewMirror Dave Lavin

    Scott, you're tips and drills are the best.....and actually useful! Thank you!

  • tob2wood
    tob2wood 3 years ago +8

    Dig in in this lessons for a while, there's a lot of knowledge in a few minutes, practice for years, really fantastic information and a massive thumbs up from Mexico City

  • Stephen Shoihet
    Stephen Shoihet Year ago

    This is great! Ive been working lately on playing arpeggios starting on all the different C's and going up the neck but I haven't tried playing them across the neck in the same position.

  • Barney Longacre
    Barney Longacre 3 years ago

    Scott, I've been down with shoulder surgery and get to start playing and practicing , now it's been 6 weeks. This is great ....YOU are great , thank you! See you in the SHED

  • Samuel Ward
    Samuel Ward 4 years ago +7

    This one REALLY helped Scott!!! Thank you so sooooo much Broheim!!! =)

  • Inglewood
    Inglewood 6 years ago +14

    Scott, you've got some brilliant excercises. Though I think it would really be helpful if you include a POV angle of sorts, or maybe a neck-positioned goPro camera? It is very convenient for the observer to be able to replicate what they see on their screen.

    • zara tihoviolato
      zara tihoviolato 3 years ago +1

      I do not agree. I'd suggest to use your ears instead of your eyes.

  • Flash001USA
    Flash001USA 3 years ago +5

    I'm a seasoned rock / blues and country bass player and I'm strong enough to record with people on a professional level along with having the opportunity of working with signed bands and being signed on past projects myself. I never learned to read but I definitely understood how important it is even knowing just your basic scales. I've done pretty good through the years and have been fortunate enough to work with great players where I have picked up a lot of it by ear but I still consider myself a student who's learning and I continue pushing myself to try to be better even at my age. I wonder if you know just how much your videos help people like me to improve our chops? Almost forgot. Learning basic shapes was the ticket for me when I first started.

  • GoldenBoyDims
    GoldenBoyDims 5 years ago

    scott you are so good i always love your intro bass playing

  • Andy Quiton
    Andy Quiton 6 years ago

    You are such a wonderful player, love learning from you and listening to you, cheers.

  • Augusto Lopez
    Augusto Lopez 2 years ago

    Real KILLER exercise Scott you've improved my bass life Thanks muchly.

  • Ray
    Ray 2 years ago

    That is PLICK'EN AWESOME DUDE... I gave this to a bass student today and am plying it on standard six string electric and acoustic guitars myself..! so dynamically useful for learning or reinforcing music theory, training the ear and muscle memory!
    Thank You Sir & God bless,
    Ray

  • Joe's Carp Adventures
    Joe's Carp Adventures 2 years ago

    Great exercise on many levels; looking forward to trying it out!

  • Sean Cushnie
    Sean Cushnie 6 years ago

    9:30 mark, about doing exactly the same with the fingering, i realised that's what i'm doing wrong. I always trip up doing really fast technical stuff, sometimes nail it, sometimes i don't. I think this will help out a lot. Great stuff

  • Adrian Dean
    Adrian Dean 2 years ago

    Thanks for this freebie, Scott. What to actually practice is really helpful

  • Michael Rinus
    Michael Rinus 6 years ago

    I'll remember this to do Regularly... Regarding consistency of the plickin hand you nailed it - when I was in the studio recording with my former band on guitar, I got a very helpful hint of out all-in-one studio-man that my playing changed every time I play. Didn't get it back then. Nowadays I understand I did always change my pick-hand-work which changed my timing each time. Consistency, consistency, consistency ;) Helps a lot!

  • Victor HP
    Victor HP 2 years ago

    Great lesson, both theory and technique at the same time. Thanks a lot!

  • I. Duhourq
    I. Duhourq 5 years ago

    This is a great teacher if you are having some class from a teacher parallely. I'm learning about the 7 modes of a scale, and knowing how they work make sense and find it much easier what Scott is teaching here. Brilliant class, but I recommend to first know a little about those modes to really get that juice out if this excercise

  • BWS TT
    BWS TT 6 years ago +1

    love it, I'll be adding this to my exercises

  • Gene Ciccone
    Gene Ciccone 2 months ago +1

    Wish there was a transcript for this showing the Frets and the fingering since his hand obscures the fretboard and sometimes it's hard to tell what notes he's playing

  • Mike Preston
    Mike Preston 3 years ago

    Very good lesson! I’m learning bass myself and stumbled upon your videos. Very talented and gifted teacher! One question? Wouldn’t the 7th scale degree, b minor b5(flat5), be a b diminished?

  • DrCorr
    DrCorr 3 years ago +1

    Xtremly usefully exercises. Thanks a lot Mr. Tommus.👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾

  • Chris Higgins
    Chris Higgins 2 years ago

    Love Scott's teachings. 👍 🇬🇧

  • The Flying Dutchman
    The Flying Dutchman 6 years ago

    Brilliant lesson again! Thanks, Scott!

  • Julian Gramajo
    Julian Gramajo 5 years ago

    Scott, every time i watch one of your videos i feel the visceral need of grabbing my bass. Thank you and greetings from Argentina!

  • Dennis Swanberg
    Dennis Swanberg 3 years ago

    Man what simple lesson that kills. You broke it down so precisely. Now I just have to the work ...love it , Technic and arpegios Thank you .. shout out from New Hampshire US

  • TimBrown5000
    TimBrown5000 2 years ago

    Wow what an awesome solo there in the intro, and you are able to talk while playing bass. Unbelievable.

  • Joel Giroux
    Joel Giroux 4 years ago +1

    Am studying, practising and playing along with this one daily -- amazing lessons, Scott -- Thank you!!!

  • Rawstar
    Rawstar 6 years ago

    Very good Scott. This is learning. It's a lot in there and it sounds good too. I've got to try this to see if I can sort it out.

  • Håkan Rönngren
    Håkan Rönngren 6 years ago +1

    I'll grab my bass and start doing this exercise this right now. No more plicking, just consistent plucking. :-)

  • Brennan Ayers
    Brennan Ayers 4 years ago

    Scott great lessons here! Thank you for all free content. I like many other viewers have a slightly hard time seeing what you are actually playing. I in all honesty think the glove has a lot to do with it. I watch other lessons and dont have the same problem. If that's the purpose of the glove, to rely on hearing rather then sight, its brilliant. Again, thanks for the videos!

  • Brian Cherry
    Brian Cherry 2 years ago

    This was the last thing I was trying to drill in when I stopped practicing religiously. I know the chords by ear, and can see the shapes for major and minor from different fingers makes this a great exercise. And I have learned them starting on the E and on A string. HOWEVER, I cant move past it. I cant play them out of order... chord progressions. They are stuck in scale order and Im not sure how to move past. Ive tried saying them, like youve suggested in the past, but since I am stuck going up the scale, Im just counting. I really want to be able to say... I-5-6-4 and play them out of that order, but I cant seem to make that hurdle. I think its because I have 2 shapes memorized for each - that and I can hear when Ive used the wrong shape, but only if I play them in order. Any advice anyone?
    I wonder why this popped back in my feed after almost 4 years...

  • Teddy Davis
    Teddy Davis 5 years ago +1

    Bass lessons with Mr. Tumnus. Great lessons. I'm learning so much so fast.

  • nick p
    nick p 3 years ago

    Scott you best!!! thank you for another great lesson.

  • viaggiatorecosmico
    viaggiatorecosmico 2 years ago

    Thank you Scott. Strong ex. I love the chromatic jazzy at the end.

  • Boboski
    Boboski Year ago

    Took me more than an hour to go up and down once without any errors. I think my left hand is dead but totally worth it!

  • Phyoomz
    Phyoomz 3 years ago

    This was just lovely. Thank you, sir.

  • wallace brown
    wallace brown 6 years ago

    This is above my pay-grade but I can't wait until I'm dealing with this issue! It's a keeper! Thanks.

  • Gabriele Failla
    Gabriele Failla 6 years ago

    Another nice one, Scott. As usual. Thanks

  • Bronko37
    Bronko37 6 years ago

    This lesson has transformed my playing already. I like to learn each arpeggio from a different fingering position. I play them forwards and backwards to a metronome from an index, middle, and pinky starting position. Then I try to interchange them in order and keep time, now that's an exercise. I do have a question for Scott, or anyone else who can answer it. In the video Scott explains that there is a progression of chords within the major scale the always goes Mj-m-m-Mj-dom-m-m7b5; my question is, is there a progression like this for a minor scale that I could also work on? Keep em coming Scott, I love the techniques you teach. Thanks so much

    • Marco Andreoni
      Marco Andreoni 6 years ago

      Basically if you start the progression from A to A have the minor scale : m, m7b5, Mj, m, m, Mj, Mj

  • Bully Thakidd
    Bully Thakidd 6 years ago +275

    everytime i feel like im making headway to being a great bassist... scott makes another video that makes me wanna quit lol

    • david monteforte
      david monteforte Year ago

      OH YEAH I HEAR YOU BRO.

    • N
      N Year ago

      Bla bla bla bla

    • Ryan
      Ryan Year ago

      It inspires me.

    • Tacitus Kilgore
      Tacitus Kilgore 2 years ago +1

      Dang man it should get under your skin and drive you to be the best you can be !!! Wrong mentality !!

    • Lemsta.au
      Lemsta.au 2 years ago

      @Davey Doodle thanks for that, now I hate myself

  • jangan subscribe
    jangan subscribe 2 years ago

    for me who has a small asian finger at first looks terrible but over time it's really fun if you have a diagram for a lesson where I can download it because I keep repeating videos when there are mistakes when I practice I am very grateful if you want to share. thank you mr scott

  • John Doe
    John Doe 2 years ago

    It s super clear. Thank a lot, really. You are the best Scott!!!

  • Jimmy Thee
    Jimmy Thee 6 years ago

    Great lesson man, thanks!

  • Tasha McManus
    Tasha McManus 5 years ago

    Thank you for reiterating what you went over in the lesson at the end. That was helpful because I watched it in a couple of different chunks.

  • Jairo Garcia
    Jairo Garcia Year ago

    Wow man 5 years later and you're about to hit a million subs! Cheers!

  • James Jazz
    James Jazz 5 years ago

    Scott; ALSO...You get around the fretboard so smoothly; what radius fretboard do you prefer? I think some of (at least a couple of your Fender CS relics) of your Fender- basses are 7.25 and you have no prob with that! I'm struggling on which P-Bass model to buy for myself b/c of the differences in radius of the fretboards. Any suggestions? Or a lesson on radius?? Thanks for the GREAT lessons!

  • bassomatic
    bassomatic Year ago

    To take this another step. Do the same thing with all the inversions. You'll find you will learn the entire fretboard. So for example first inversion of the c major arpeggio is E, G, B, C. same 4 notes but played in a different order. Do this in the same manner Scott lays out for all inversions in all keys. See you in a while!

  • The - Selfish - Meme
    The - Selfish - Meme 3 years ago

    It's all the white notes... lolz... but really love the stuff about joining it all up with chromatic passing notes... this is a great way to get the important info into a young jazzer's head... Great stuff - Thankyou, sir!

  • Matt T
    Matt T 3 years ago

    Excellent lesson, thank you!

  • Paul Schofield
    Paul Schofield 6 years ago

    I've got a question about consistency with "plicking" hand fingerings. I've run into problems from only practicing an exercise where I "lead" with the index finger, and as a result, I didn't develop good plucking finger independence. Now I try to practice every exercise leading with the index plucking finger, and then switching to plucking the first note with the middle finger.
    Do you recommend that approach for developing plucking finger independence?
    Thanks, Scott!

  • and then i said
    and then i said 6 years ago +27

    this is also a very nice way to get a feel for the modes.
    Choose a scale, go through the arpeggios.

  • Daniel Laflamme
    Daniel Laflamme 3 years ago

    Thanks for sharing your skill and knowledge

  • Enlightening Humor
    Enlightening Humor 6 years ago

    Really slick editing trick with the color change. Well done!

  • Arknark
    Arknark 3 years ago +1

    I love these intros; the laughing Scott shot is so endearing.

  • Jonny Stiz TV
    Jonny Stiz TV 3 years ago

    Scott, you’ve got killer tone man! What is your favorite bass you have?!

  • TheReaper1337
    TheReaper1337 6 years ago

    This exercise is soooooo good! It's really KILLER! The stringcrossing in this is superhelpfull, even if you play with a pick as i mostly do.

  • Butters Stotch
    Butters Stotch 4 years ago

    HA NO WAY! after watching your videos I started practicing that for myself last night !!! Thanks for the vids they are great.

  • J WConstruction
    J WConstruction 2 years ago

    Humble and talented, gets the point across mater of fact,,,word, and hella funny